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Ziemia/Zjawiska natury (584)

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! EN_01178054_0001 SCI
Zodiacal light over an observatory. The night sky lit by zodiacal light above the Paranal platform on Cerro Paranal mountain, Chile. This is the home of ESO's (European Southern Observatory) Very Large Telescope (VLT) array, the world's most advanced ground-based astronomical observatory. One of the 8.2-metre VLT Unit Telescopes, and a 1.8-metre Auxiliary Telescope can be seen at right.
This image may not be used by or to promote the arms, nuclear power or tobacco industries or any religious organisation, or in any discriminatory way, or to imply the endorsement by ESO of any product, service or activity
! EN_01178054_0002 SCI
A Broken Spectre on Red Screes in the Lake District, Cumbria, UK.
! EN_01178054_0005 SCI
^BArtificial cloud.^b View of a spectacular nocti- lucent cloud after sunset. This "cloud" was formed from the exhaust of a missile launched from a distant firing range. Noctilucent clouds are those which reflect the Sun's light after it has set, which requires that they be at high altitude. The uppermost parts of this cloud are iridescent (nacreous), having the appearance of mother-of- pearl. Natural nacreous clouds occur at altitudes of 20-25 kilometres. The lower parts of this cloud are redder due to the scattering of blue light by the large amount of dust and water in the lower atmosphere. Its convoluted shape is due to the differing wind speeds at different altitudes.
! EN_01178067_0001 SCI
Barringer Crater, also known as Meteor Crater, Arizona, USA. The crater is about 170 metres deep and 1200 metres in diameter. It was formed by an iron meteorite that collided with the Earth approximately 50,000 years ago.
! EN_01178067_0002 SCI
Lake Yanisyarvi, Republic of Karelia, Russia. The basin for this lake was formed by a meteorite impact 700 million years ago. It measures 14 kilometres in diameter. Water is blue, vegetation is green and land cleared for agriculture is brown. Image taken by NASA's Landsat 7 satellite on 5th September 1999.
! EN_01178067_0003 SCI
Lonar Crater lake, India, Satellite image. The basin for this saltwater lake was formed by a meteorite impact roughly 50,000 years ago. The crater is 1.8 kilometres in diameter and 137 metres deep. Image taken by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) instrument on NASA's Terra satellite on 29th November 2004.
! EN_01178067_0004 SCI
Pingualuit crater, satellite image. This impact crater (blue circle at centre left) is in northern Quebec, Canada. The crater measures 3.4 kilometres in diameter, is 400 metres deep and holds a freshwater lake. The crater was formed by a meteorite impact roughly 1.4 million years ago.
! EN_01178067_0005 SCI
Nicholson crater, satellite image. This crater, in the Northwest Territories, Canada, was formed by a meteorite impact 400 million years ago. Water is dark blue, ice is light blue. The crater measures 12.5 kilometres in diameter and contains a lake. Image taken by NASA's Landsat 7 satellite on 6th July 2000.
! EN_01178067_0006 SCI
Spider Crater, satellite image. This crater (centre left), in Western Australia, is estimated to have been formed between 900 and 600 million years ago. Vegetation is green and bare rock is red. Image taken by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite in April 2008.
! EN_01178067_0007 SCI
Serra da Cangalha crater, satellite image. This impact crater, in Tocantins, Brazil, was formed 220 million years ago. It has a diameter of 12 kilometres. Vegetation is green, bare ground is purple. Image taken by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite on 23rd June 2006.
! EN_01178067_0008 SCI
Aorounga Crater, satellite image. This impact crater is in the Sahara Desert, in Chad. It is one of the best-preserved impact structures in the world and is estimated to be around 345 million years old. It measures 17 kilometres in diameter. Image taken from the International Space Station (ISS)on 25th July 2009.
! EN_01178067_0009 SCI
Gosses Bluff crater, seen from spaces. This impact crater is 160 kilometres to the west of Alice Springs, Australia. It is seen between two mountain ranges: the Macdonnell Range (right) and the James Range (left). The crater's central ring of hills, around 4.5 kilometres wide, has a faint outer ring. It is thought that the crater formed when a 1-kilometre-wide meteorite hit the Earth 142 million years ago. Image taken from the International Space Station (ISS).
! EN_01178067_0010 SCI
Serra da Cangalha crater, satellite image. North is at top. This impact crater (upper left) is located in north-eastern Brazil. The crater, which was formed some 220 million years ago following a meteorite impact, is 13 kilometres across, with a central elevated crater (2 kilometres across). The colours indicate varying types of vegetation (green), as well as bare ground (purple). Fields are at lower right. The non-cultivated land is mostly a land type known as cerrado (a mixture of savanna and riverside forests). This image, around 40 kilometres across, was obtained by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite, on 23 June 2006.
! EN_01178067_0011 SCI
Nordlinger Ries Crater, satellite image. The city of Nordlinger is located within this crater in Bavaria, Germany. The crater was formed around 14 million years ago by the impact of a meteorite. It has a diameter of 24 kilometres. Dark green areas are forest, bright green agricultural land and grey buildings and paved surfaces. Image taken by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite on 7th September 2006. For an image showing the outline of the crater, see C007/4459.
! EN_01178067_0013 SCI
Shoemaker crater. Satellite image of the Shoemaker impact crater in Western Australia. This deeply-eroded remnant of a former impact crater consists of a central circular region of uplifted archaean granite about 12 km in diameter, surrounded by a downwarped ring of sedimentary rocks with an outer limit of disturbance at about 30 km in diameter, which is a minimum estimate of the size of the original crater. The area also contains a number of seasonal salt lakes. Image acquired by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite, on 23rd September 2000.
! EN_01178067_0014 SCI
Karakul, Tajikstan, satellite image. Karakul (also known as Qarokul) is a lake (centre, coloured dark blue) located in the Pamir Mountains of Tajikstan. It measures 25 kilometres in diameter and lies within an impact crater measuring 52 kilometres in diameter. The impact was thought to have occured roughly 25 million years ago. Imaged by the Operational Land Imager (OLI) on board the Landsat 8 satellite on 7th August 2014. The OLI sensor detects wavelengths across 9 spectral bands. This image was created using infrared, red and green spectral bands. It depicts an area measuring 135 kilometres across.
! EN_01178067_0015 SCI
Lake Tai, China, satellite image. Lake Tai (centre, dark blue), also known as Taihu, is a large freshwater lake near the Yangtse river (at top) and Shanghai in China. It covers an area of 2,250 square kilometres and was formed as a result of water filling a 65 kilometres wide crater from an impact that occured roughly 70 million years ago. Imaged by the Operational Land Imager (OLI) on board the Landsat 8 satellite on 22nd July 2014. The OLI sensor detects wavelengths across 9 spectral bands. This image was created using infrared, red and green spectral bands. It depicts an area measuring 170 kilometres across.
! EN_01178067_0016 SCI
Popigai, Russia, satellite image. Popigai (dark brown) is a 90 kilometre wide depression caused by a meteor impact that occurred roughly 35 million years ago. The intense heat and pressure caused by the impact caused graphite in the rock to turn into diamonds.Imaged by the Operational Land Imager (OLI) on board the Landsat 8 satellite on 14th August 2013. The OLI sensor detects wavelengths across 9 spectral bands. This image was created using infrared, red and green spectral bands. It depicts an area measuring 130 kilometres across.
! EN_01178067_0017 SCI
Roter Kamm crater, Namib desert, Namibia, satellite image. This crater (lower left) measures 2.5 kilometers in diameter and was created by a meteor impact that occured roughly 5 million years ago. Imaged by the Operational Land Imager (OLI) on board the Landsat 8 satellite on 17th April 2015. The OLI sensor detects wavelengths across 9 spectral bands. This image was created using infrared, red and green spectral bands. It depicts an area measuring 30 kilometres across.
! EN_01178067_0018 SCI
Upheaval dome, Utah, USA, satellite image. Upheaval dome is an eroded impact crater (centre middle) that measures 5 kilometers in diameter. It was created by an impact that occured roughly 5 million years ago. Imaged by the Operational Land Imager (OLI) on board the Landsat 8 satellite on 13th March 2015. The OLI sensor detects wavelengths across 9 spectral bands. This image was created using infrared, red and green spectral bands. It depicts an area measuring 26 kilometres across.

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